The History of Live Blood Analysis

THE HISTORY OF DRY BLOOD ANALYSIS

THE HISTORY OF DRY BLOOD ANALYSIS (THE OXIDATIVE STRESS TEST)

In the 1920s, European medical practitioners added a twist to unconventional microscopy when they began looking at dried blood samples, later called the Oxidative Stress Test.

The dry blood spot is considered to be a hologram of the human body, a little like the eye in iridology, i.e. the different rings in the sample represent a different part of the body. Therefore, wherever the abnormality appears in the bloodspot tells us approximately where the problem is occurring in the body.

Another important aspect of this test is that each spot represents a time frame; the first and largest spot of blood taken reflects the current day, the latter spots provide a reflection of the patient’s health, many months or even years ago, and will highlight the deeper seated or chronic issues underlying the client’s current symptoms.

How this historical view works is little understood; however, it has been the observations of many researchers that as a person heals, it is the first and largest blood spot on the slide that corrects itself towards the healthy sample first, followed by the second and then the third, etc., etc., over a period of months, as the patient’s health problems reverse. The patterns that form are observed under the microscope. These patterns provide us with insights into the imbalances present in the organs and systems of the body These observations are cross-referenced with existing medical conditions or signs and symptoms. The resulting patterns seen in the dry blood under microscope brightfield setting reveal a characteristic ‘footprint’ which can be seen in similar cases and, thus, can be indicative of certain generalised pathologies.

For instance, cases of advanced degenerative disease show very poor clotting and minimal fibrin formation with many white ‘puddles’ appearing throughout the sample. In contrast, a healthy control subject’s blood shows a tight, fibrin-rich clotting pattern with no white puddles.

In the 1930s, the head of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr H L Bowlen MD, introduced the dry blood test to America. Dr Bowlen learned the dry test from President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s physicians, Drs Heitlan and LaGarde.

In the 1970s, one of Heitlan-LaGarde’s students, Dr Robert Bradford of the American Biologics Hospital in Mexico, began teaching other practitioners how to perform this test. So there is now over 70 years of dry blood testing data by hundreds of healthcare practitioners worldwide.

Although live and dry blood analysis have been in existence for many years, their practice and acceptance in the mainstream of medicine is still very much underestimated or neglected altogether.

Because it is not being taught at medical school is the main reason for this lack of acceptance and GPs don’t have the time or inclination to study further. They are often bogged down with administration and an ever increasing patient load.

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