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Live Blood Analysis Course

Live Blood Analysis Course – Choosing The Best Training course

Choosing the best live blood analysis course:

There are a number of live blood analysis courses available, either on line or at training centres. So, how do you choose the best one for you?

Dr Okker from Live Blood Online has been practicing practising and teaching live blood analysis for 15 years now and has trained many successful practitioners all around the world. We asked him for his advice on finding the best training course and what to look out for.

Is the organisation well known and recognised? Choose to train with a well-known establishment that has trained many practitioners, do they have a directory or list of attendees? Is the tutor well known and established?

What is being offered? You should expect to receive wall charts, a substantial and well written manual, good clear, concise training covering naturopathic, pleomorphic and allopathic perspectives. Ask about what on-going support is provided and what will be required for certification. Will the establishment be able to list you as a practitioner who has trained with them? Microscope and equipment advice should be available.

What does the course cover? Make sure the training covers use of the microscope, correct sampling techniques for live and dried/dry blood analysis, all of the anomalies in live and dry/dried blood analysis as well as showing how to join the dots and put it all together to get a clear and precise picture of what is being viewed.

How is it being taught?  Is the training In-House or Online Training? Dr Okker advises that online training has the edge over in-house training for a few reasons; 1) In house training often involves expensive travel and accommodation as well as being tiring when you need to be at your most alert. In-house training courses are very intensive and you need to be alert and ready to take notes or use your memory. 2) Online training offers the huge advantage of being able to study from your home, office or practice at your leisure without the expense of travel & accommodation. Another big advantage is that you are provided with videos of the lessons so you are able to go over the material as many times as you like, a much better way of learning than struggling to take notes and/or remember as at in-house training.

Do they offer help and advice on choosing the right microscope? This is a big investment and the right advice here is very important to avoid any costly mistakes. Does the establishment have a microscope expert on board?

Is Dark field & Bright field microscopy taught? In Dr Okkers view dark field microscopy is superior to phase contrast as some anomalies can only be seen by a good quality darkfield system and not seen by phase contrast.

Ask about your tutors experience: Look for an establishment that has a well-known tutor with lots of experience (preferably a live blood analysis practitioner) as well as being a good teacher.

Certification: Do they provide a certificate after the training course? Is it recognised by insurance co’s?

Accreditation & Recognition; Are they a member of a recognised body or organisation? Look for membership of naturopathic bodies such as the CMA Complementary Medical Association (UK).

Do they offer back up and support? Dr Okker advises to look for training where on-going support is offered after training– maybe through access to a private group, a training site or some form of continuing back-up.

Dr Okker Botha: Masters: Homeopathy (M.Tech. Hom), HID – Naturopathy (SNSH UK) Adv. Nutrition (SNHS UK), Adv. Applied Microscopy for Nutritional Evaluation & Correction (NuLife Sciences).

Dr Okker Botha is a registered homeopathic doctor who has established himself as a leader in Live and Dry Blood Analysis. He is the tutor at Live Blood Online www.livebloodonline.com where the course draws on information from the leading researchers in microscopic blood analysis in the world.

He has over 15 years experience in his live blood analysis clinical practice as well as training many practitioners world-wide in this exciting technique.

Dr Okker is considered one of the leading authorities in the field of Live Blood Analysis.

“Our blood analysis courses are training systems for those who want to learn how to use blood analysis to its full potential.”

Due to the lack of comprehensive training in many countries across the world, many practitioners are under-utilizing this amazing technique.

Darkfield Microscopy

Dark Field Microscopy

Dark Field microscopy is a microscope illumination technique used to observe unstained samples causing them to appear brightly lit against a dark, almost purely black, background.

When light hits an object, rays are scattered in all directions. The design of the dark field microscope is such that it removes the dispersed light so that only the scattered beams hit the sample.

The introduction of a condenser and/or stop below the stage ensures that these light rays will hit the specimen at different angles, rather than as a direct light source above/below the object.

The result is a “cone of light” where rays are diffracted, reflected and/or refracted off the object, ultimately, allowing you to view a specimen in dark field.

A dark field microscope is ideal for viewing objects that are unstained, transparent and absorb little or no light.

These specimens often have similar refractive indices as their surroundings, making them hard to distinguish with other illumination techniques.

Dark field can be used to study marine organisms such as algae and plankton, diatoms, insects, fibres, hairs, yeast, live bacterium, protozoa as well as cells and tissues and is ideal for live blood analysis enabling the practitioner to see much more than is possible with other lighting methods.