Dried Blood Analysis

Dry Blood Rings

Dried Blood Analysis

Dried Blood Analysis or the Oxidative Stress Test (OST) was developed in Europe in the 1920’s and has since been used by medical practitioners and naturopaths in many countries across the world.

In the 1930’s NATO physicians, Dr Heitan and Dr La Garde, introduced Dried Blood Analysis to Dr Bowlen (head of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston in the 1930’s), and later Robert Bradford (of American Biologics Hospital in Tijuana, Mexico).

For this reason Dried Blood Analysis is also referred to as the HLB test (Heitan, La Garde, Bradford).

In essence the Dried Blood Analysis test is an evaluation of a patient’s coagulation morphology. There is a very distinct difference between the dried blood sample of a healthy individual and that of a chronically ill patient. The healthy sample is a solid mat of pinkish-red dried blood with a strong, well-interconnected fibrin network. 

In the presence of degeneration, toxins and other imbalances, the dried blood sample shows white areas, called polymerized protein puddles (PPPs) and other abnormalities that can be indicative of certain systemic conditions.

As the blood dries on the slide, there is a natural centrifugal activity whereby the different elements in the blood spin out into rings, depending on their specific gravity. Organs near the centre of the body create light PPPs that don’t spin out very far, whereas heavier PPPs are created by lymph and skin conditions that spin out around the outside of the layer. The size and shape of the PPPs is also suggestive of the nature of the condition, which we cover in the live and dry blood analysis training  course https://livebloodonline.com/the-training-course/

The PPPs observed in the dried blood test are believed by some researchers to be caused by the presence of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) and the presence of water-soluble fragments of the extracellular matrix.

This theory is supported by some emerging research and we look at the mechanisms of DIC and degradation of the extracellular matrix in the live and dry blood analysis training course.

A healthy dry blood sample shows a healthy, even red colour, no white open areas and a distinct, interconnected fibrin network.

Copyright Dr Okker R. Botha, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2009

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