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Oxidative Stress

Oxidative Stress

Oxidative stress is an imbalance between the production of free radicals and the ability of the body to counteract or detoxify their harmful effects through neutralization by antioxidants.

What are free radicals?

A free radicals is an oxygen containing molecule that has one or more unpaired electrons, making it highly reactive with other molecules.

Oxygen by-products are relatively unreactive but some of these can undergo metabolism within the biological system to give rise to these highly reactive oxidants. Not all reactive oxygen species are harmful to the body. Some of them are useful in killing off invading pathogens or microbes.

Free radicals can chemically interact with cell components such as DNA, protein or lipid and steal their electrons in order to become stabilized. This, in turn, destabilizes the cell component molecules which then seek and steal an electron from another molecule, therefore triggering a large chain of free radical reactions and oxidative stress.

What are antioxidants?

Every cell that utilizes enzymes and oxygen to perform functions is exposed to oxygen free radical reactions that have the potential to cause serious damage to the cell. Antioxidants are molecules present in cells that prevent these reactions by donating an electron to the free radicals without becoming destabilized themselves. An imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants is the underlying basis of oxidative stress.

Damaged caused by oxidative stress

Much of the damage caused by oxidative stress arises from its modification of the DNA inside a cell’s nucleus which gives rise to mutations.

Examples of the conditions caused by free radical damage include:

  • Neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease
  • Mutagenesis and cancer
  • Heart and blood vessel disorders such as heart failure, heart attacks, atherosclerosis and cardiac ischemia
  • Lung conditions such as emphysema and lung cancer
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Cataracts and vision disorders such as retrolental fibroplasia
  • Arthritis and inflammatory disease
  • Diabetes
  • Kidney disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Gut disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease
  • Skin lesions such as those caused by sun damage
  • Lipoprotein oxidation in new-borns
  • Failure of organ transplant
  • Frostbite
  • Haemolytic anaemia, protoporphyrin, photo oxidation
  • Autoimmune diseases
The History of Live Blood Analysis

THE HISTORY OF DRY BLOOD ANALYSIS

THE HISTORY OF DRY BLOOD ANALYSIS (THE OXIDATIVE STRESS TEST)

In the 1920s, European medical practitioners added a twist to unconventional microscopy when they began looking at dried blood samples, later called the Oxidative Stress Test.

The dry blood spot is considered to be a hologram of the human body, a little like the eye in iridology, i.e. the different rings in the sample represent a different part of the body. Therefore, wherever the abnormality appears in the bloodspot tells us approximately where the problem is occurring in the body.

Another important aspect of this test is that each spot represents a time frame; the first and largest spot of blood taken reflects the current day, the latter spots provide a reflection of the patient’s health, many months or even years ago, and will highlight the deeper seated or chronic issues underlying the client’s current symptoms.

How this historical view works is little understood; however, it has been the observations of many researchers that as a person heals, it is the first and largest blood spot on the slide that corrects itself towards the healthy sample first, followed by the second and then the third, etc., etc., over a period of months, as the patient’s health problems reverse. The patterns that form are observed under the microscope. These patterns provide us with insights into the imbalances present in the organs and systems of the body These observations are cross-referenced with existing medical conditions or signs and symptoms. The resulting patterns seen in the dry blood under microscope brightfield setting reveal a characteristic ‘footprint’ which can be seen in similar cases and, thus, can be indicative of certain generalised pathologies.

For instance, cases of advanced degenerative disease show very poor clotting and minimal fibrin formation with many white ‘puddles’ appearing throughout the sample. In contrast, a healthy control subject’s blood shows a tight, fibrin-rich clotting pattern with no white puddles.

In the 1930s, the head of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, Dr H L Bowlen MD, introduced the dry blood test to America. Dr Bowlen learned the dry test from President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s physicians, Drs Heitlan and LaGarde.

In the 1970s, one of Heitlan-LaGarde’s students, Dr Robert Bradford of the American Biologics Hospital in Mexico, began teaching other practitioners how to perform this test. So there is now over 70 years of dry blood testing data by hundreds of healthcare practitioners worldwide.

Although live and dry blood analysis have been in existence for many years, their practice and acceptance in the mainstream of medicine is still very much underestimated or neglected altogether.

Because it is not being taught at medical school is the main reason for this lack of acceptance and GPs don’t have the time or inclination to study further. They are often bogged down with administration and an ever increasing patient load.