Week 6 on the live blood analysis online training course – pleomorphic growth forms

We are now on week 6 of the live blood analysis online training course and studying pleomorphic growth forms in the blood.

Various pleomorphic growth forms can be observed in darkfield microscopy such as rod-form bacteria above.

ROD-FORM BACTERIA IN THE BLOOD

In Live Blood Analysis we view the clients live blood magnified on to a screen.
We look at the Red Blood Cells (RBCs), the white blood cells (WBC’s), the platelets and the plasma.
We compare the clients blood picture to normal healthy blood and look for anomalies in the size & shape of the cells, if they are free floating or sticking together, too many, too few, bacterial forms, yeast markers, fibrin spicules, crystals or protoplasts in the plasma.

ROD-FORM BACTERIA IN THE BLOOD” is taken from the 500+ page Live Blood Analysis Online Training Manual 2015″

Rod-form bacteria are rod-shaped microorganisms that move around actively in the plasma. The presence of rod-form bacteria is related to an under active immune system and a terrain that supports the development of pathogenic bacteria. The presence of many rod-forms is usually associated with some mucus-producing infection. Measures are used to correct the imbalance of the terrain. These include alkalizing formulae such as Base powder, wheatgrass and other green food extracts, trace minerals, as well as immune-building supplements and lifestyle changes.

Appearance:
Rod-shaped bodies that move around actively in the plasma.

Relevance:
An optimally functioning immune system will prevent rod-forms from being present in a drop of peripheral blood.

Medical Perspective:
As far as conventional medicine is concerned, bacteria will only be seen in the blood in cases of septicemia. However, various types of bacteria are clearly visible in live blood of patients who are not suffering from septicemia. Very interesting research conducted in Canada and published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology proved that bacteria are in fact present in the blood (J Clin Microbiol. 2002 December; 40(12): 4771–4775).

Copyright Dr Okker R. Botha, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2009

To find out more about implications, associated symptoms, pleomorphic perspective and interventions and live blood analysis online training, please join us on the next training course April 3rd 2018

Join on this fascinating journey of live blood analysis!

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